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Epidemiology of lawnmower-related injuries in children: A 10-year review

Published:January 06, 2016DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2015.11.025

      Highlights

      • The estimated national incidence of lawnmower-related injuries (LMI) is 9,351per year (10.6 LMI per 100,000 children per year; based on the 2010 US Census data). This incidence has remained unchanged for over 2 decades.
      • The most commonly injured body regions were the hand and/or finger (30.1%), followed by lower extremity (16.8%), and face and/or eye (14.0%).
      • The leading types of LMIs were laceration (32.9%), followed by soft tissue injury (22.9%), and burn (13.5%).
      • Amputations (RR: 11.5; 95% CI: 11.00 to 12.10; P < .0001) and fractures (RR: 2.82; 95% CI: 2.64 to 3.00; P < .0001) had the greatest risk of requiring hospitalization.

      Abstract

      Background

      Lawnmower-related injuries (LMI) in children are commonly disfiguring and usually preventable. Owing to concerns about the large number and severity of pediatric LMI, we sought to describe the current epidemiology of these injuries in the United States.

      Methods

      Data were obtained from the 2004 to 2013 National Electronic Surveillance system of the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission for children ≤20 years old. Demographic, injury pattern, and treatment data were analyzed.

      Results

      There were an estimated 93,508 LMI, with an incidence of 9,351 LMI per year. The hand and/or fingers (30.1%), lower extremity (16.8%), and face and/or eye (14.0%) were the body parts most commonly injured. Amputations (relative risk [RR]: 11.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.00 to 12.10; P < .0001) and fractures (RR: 2.82; 95% CI: 2.64 to 3.00; P < .0001) were more likely to require hospitalization.

      Conclusions

      The estimated annual incidence of LMI in children has remained unchanged over the past decade, and has remained constant when compared with a previous 15-year review using Consumer Product Safety Commission data for the same age group. Reinforcement of prevention strategies and manufacturer redesign of lawnmowers are long overdue.

      Keywords

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