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Explaining the excess morbidity of emergency general surgery: packed red blood cell and fresh frozen plasma transfusion practices are associated with major complications in nonmassively transfused patients

Published:January 08, 2016DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2015.11.031

      Abstract

      Background

      Intraoperative blood product transfusions carry risk but are often necessary in emergency general surgery (EGS).

      Methods

      We queried the American College of Surgery-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database for EGS patients (2008 to 2012) at 2 tertiary academic hospitals. Outcomes included rates of high packed red blood cell (pRBC) use (estimated blood loss:pRBC < 350:1) and high fresh frozen plasma (FFP) use (FFP:pRBC >1:1.5). Patients were then stratified by exposure to high blood product use. Stepwise logistic regression was performed.

      Results

      Of 992 patients, 33% underwent EGS. Estimated blood loss was similar between EGS and non-EGS (282 vs 250 cc, P = .288). EGS patients were more often exposed to high pRBC use (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 2.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11 to 3.66) and high-FFP use (OR = 2.75, 95% CI: = 1.10 to 6.84). High blood product use was independently associated with major nonbleeding complications (high pRBC: OR = 1.73, 95% CI = 1.04 to 2.91; high FFP: OR = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.15 to 4.02).

      Conclusions

      Despite similar blood loss, EGS patients received higher rates of intraoperative blood product transfusion, which was independently associated with major complication.

      Keywords

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