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Gender disparities during the transition into practice of newly trained surgeons: Are female surgeons left behind?

  • Priyanka Chugh
    Affiliations
    Department of Surgery, Boston Medical Center, Boston University Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    Department of Surgery, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA
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  • Katherine He
    Affiliations
    Department of Surgery, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA
    Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
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  • Naomi M. Sell
    Affiliations
    Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
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  • Allan Stolarski
    Affiliations
    Department of Surgery, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA
    Department of Surgery, Boston Medical Center, Boston University Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
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  • Edward Whang
    Affiliations
    Department of Surgery, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA
    Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
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  • Gentian Kristo
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. Department of Surgery, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System (112-C), 1400 VFW Parkway, West Roxbury, MA, 02132, USA.
    Affiliations
    Department of Surgery, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA
    Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    Search for articles by this author
Published:December 23, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2020.12.027
      Female surgeons encounter well-known gender-based inequities such as lower salary, less professional promotion opportunities, underrepresentation in leadership positions, decreased scholarly productivity, more domestic and childrearing responsibilities, increased work-family conflicts leading to higher rate of divorce, depression, and burnout, sexual harassment and gender discrimination. Furthermore, despite evidence that female surgeons have equal or even slightly better patient outcomes than male surgeons,
      • Wallis C.J.
      • Ravi B.
      • Coburn N.
      • et al.
      Comparison of postoperative outcomes among patients treated by male and female surgeons: a population based matched cohort study.
      discriminatory perceptions of incompetence and distrust of the female surgeon’s skills persist.
      • Sarsons H.
      Interpreting Signals in the Labor Market: Evidence from Medical Referrals [Job Market Paper].
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