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Pandemic’s surgical sabotage

  • Author Footnotes
    1 Personal address … 1101–5750 Larch St. Vancouver BC, Canada, V6M4E2.
    ,
    Author Footnotes
    2 HISTORIAN AND MEMBER OF NORTH PACIFIC SURGICAL ASSOCIATION North Pacific Surgical Association, c/o Spire Management, 3340 Commercial St SE, Suite 220, Salem, Oregon, 97302 USA.
    Nis Schmidt
    Footnotes
    1 Personal address … 1101–5750 Larch St. Vancouver BC, Canada, V6M4E2.
    2 HISTORIAN AND MEMBER OF NORTH PACIFIC SURGICAL ASSOCIATION North Pacific Surgical Association, c/o Spire Management, 3340 Commercial St SE, Suite 220, Salem, Oregon, 97302 USA.
    Affiliations
    Faculty of Medicine University of British Columbia, 317 – 2194 Health Sciences Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T1Z3, Canada
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Personal address … 1101–5750 Larch St. Vancouver BC, Canada, V6M4E2.
    2 HISTORIAN AND MEMBER OF NORTH PACIFIC SURGICAL ASSOCIATION North Pacific Surgical Association, c/o Spire Management, 3340 Commercial St SE, Suite 220, Salem, Oregon, 97302 USA.

      Highlights

      • Development of surgery was slow historically due to pain, sepsis, superstition etc.
      • Progression depended on progress in the other fields of endeavour.
      • Surgery is perhaps the Zentih of medical care but always has to overcome challenges.
      • Modern surgical care needs enormous supportive services to be effective.
      • The present pandemic has virtually sabotaged surgical services globally.

      Abstract

      Surgical care has steadily advanced and improved over hundreds of years. The evolution of surgical care in the past compared to advances in today's world was shockingly slow, with many interruptions and oppositions, but surgical advancement could only move forward if all other advancements in technology, scientific understanding, social and traditional concerns also progressed. This essay wishes to follow the incredible changes, that have enhanced or mitigated today's surgical services, but also events, like our present pandemic, that have interfered, even sabotaged the delivery of surgical services.

      Keywords

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