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Surgical Skills Coaches: Preparing for a peer-assisted learning model to train medical students in surgical skills

Published:September 05, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2022.08.022
      A major barrier to medical student surgical skills training is the limited teaching capacity of clinical instructors, including surgical faculty members and resident trainees, because of busy clinical, pedagogical, and personal schedules. Peer-assisted learning (PAL) is a powerful adjunct to the current undergraduate surgical education curriculum and can be harnessed to address teaching capacity issues.
      • Saleh M.
      • Sinha Y.
      • Weinberg D.
      Using peer-assisted learning to teach basic surgical skills: medical students' experiences.
      Because of the closeness in experience between peer teachers and learners, peer teachers can provide context-appropriate and high-quality feedback and increase motivation.
      • Beard J.H.
      • O’sullivan P.
      • Palmer B.J.A.
      • Qiu M.
      • Kim E.H.
      Peer assisted learning in surgical skills laboratory training: a pilot study.
      • Carr S.E.
      • Brand G.
      • Wei L.
      • et al.
      “Helping someone with a skill sharpens it in your own mind”: a mixed method study exploring health professions students experiences of Peer Assisted Learning (PAL).
      • Preece R.
      • Dickinson E.C.
      • Sherif M.
      • et al.
      Peer-assisted teaching of basic surgical skills.
      PAL uniquely affords students early the role of clinical educator and opportunities to develop instructional skills as future medical educators,
      • Dandavino M.
      • Snell L.
      • Wiseman J.
      Why medical students should learn how to teach.
      and student-led PAL has been shown to be either non-inferior or superior to faculty- or resident-led teaching.
      • Graziano S.C.
      Randomized surgical training for medical students: resident versus peer-led teaching.
      ,
      • Tolsgaard M.G.
      • Gustafsson A.
      • Rasmussen M.B.
      • Høiby P.
      • Müller C.G.
      • Ringsted C.
      Student teachers can be as good as associate professors in teaching clinical skills.
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