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The University of Michigan Academy of Surgical Educators: A simple but innovative way to promote the value of surgical education and celebrate surgical educators

  • Grace J. Kim
    Correspondence
    University of Michigan, 1500 E Medical Center Drive, SPC 5331, Ann Arbor, 48109-5331, MI, USA.
    Affiliations
    University of Michigan, Department of Surgery, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
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Published:September 06, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2022.08.023
      The requisite job of clinical educator in surgery can be difficult and seem under-appreciated. There is usually no separate classroom or truly protected time for clinical surgeon educators who often take time out of their own clinics, inpatient rounds, or operating rooms to teach residents and medical students. Intentional teaching, deliberate and purposeful instruction that teaches towards specific learning goals,
      • Hargraves V.
      Intentional teaching.
      often must occur alongside patient care with the sacrifice of efficiency.
      • Vinden C.
      • Malthaner R.
      • McGee J.
      • McClure J.A.
      • Winick-Ng J.
      • Liu K.
      • Nash D.M.
      • Welk B.
      • Dubois L.
      Teaching surgery takes time: the impact of surgical education on time in the operating room.
      While learners can be appreciative, the dedication and skill of these teachers may not be captured by the conventional departmental metrics in research, clinical, or administrative productivity by which faculty are valued. With high burnout rates among academic faculty,
      • Shah D.T.
      • Williams V.N.
      • Thorndyke L.E.
      • Marsh E.E.
      • Sonnino R.E.
      • Block S.M.
      • Viggiano T.R.
      Restoring faculty vitality in academic medicine when burnout threatens.
      ,
      • Nassar A.K.
      • Waheed A.
      • Tuma F.
      Academic clinicians' workload challenges and burnout analysis.
      and the physical and emotional abundance, “life's fuel tank,” from which these educators draw diminishing, it is crucial to recognize these efforts, skills, and contributions in the clinical education of surgery.
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      References

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        • Vinden C.
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        Restoring faculty vitality in academic medicine when burnout threatens.
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        Academic clinicians' workload challenges and burnout analysis.
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