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Experience of surgical subspecialty residents on general surgery rotations

  • Stephanie Sisak
    Affiliations
    Cincinnati Research on Education in Surgical Training (CREST), University of Cincinnati, Department of Surgery, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0558, USA
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  • Christen E. Salyer
    Affiliations
    Cincinnati Research on Education in Surgical Training (CREST), University of Cincinnati, Department of Surgery, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0558, USA
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  • Alexander R. Cortez
    Affiliations
    Cincinnati Research on Education in Surgical Training (CREST), University of Cincinnati, Department of Surgery, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0558, USA
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  • Dennis M. Vaysburg
    Affiliations
    Cincinnati Research on Education in Surgical Training (CREST), University of Cincinnati, Department of Surgery, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0558, USA
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  • R. Cutler Quillin III
    Affiliations
    Cincinnati Research on Education in Surgical Training (CREST), University of Cincinnati, Department of Surgery, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0558, USA
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  • Robert M. Van Haren
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. Division of Thoracic Surgery, Medical Science Building. 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0558, USA.
    Affiliations
    Cincinnati Research on Education in Surgical Training (CREST), University of Cincinnati, Department of Surgery, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0558, USA
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Published:October 21, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2022.10.044

      Highlights

      • Off-service rotations are an important component of surgical subspecialty training.
      • Subspecialty residents perform less cases than general surgery residents.
      • Off-service rotations for subspecialty residents are valuable despite case numbers.
      • General surgery rotations help subspecialty residents prepare for their career.

      Abstract

      Background

      Surgical subspecialty residents complete 5–6 years of training which includes general surgery rotations. A lack of data exists evaluating these rotations. This study aims to identify discrepancies in subspecialty training and improve the quality of surgical education.

      Methods

      Case logs for surgical subspecialty residents and general surgery residents at our institution were analyzed and queried for cases performed on general surgery rotations. A survey was distributed to subspecialty residents regarding their perceptions of these rotations.

      Results

      50 residents were included in the study and the majority were male (n = 27, 54%). Subspecialty residents perform fewer cases per month compared to general surgery residents (13 vs 21, p < 0.001). 75% of subspecialty residents were satisfied with their experience on general surgery rotations.

      Conclusions

      Subspecialty residents perform fewer operations on general surgery rotations. Despite this, most are satisfied with off-service rotations and believe they are an important part of their education.

      Keywords

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