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Using the tools we have to improve perioperative outcomes for mastectomy patients with severe persistent mental illness

  • Chandler S. Cortina
    Affiliations
    Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA

    Medical College of Wisconsin Cancer Center, Milwaukee, WI, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Amanda L. Kong
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA.
    Affiliations
    Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA

    Medical College of Wisconsin Cancer Center, Milwaukee, WI, USA
    Search for articles by this author
Published:January 21, 2023DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2023.01.015
      In this month's issue, Deshpande et al. report on the relationship between severe persistent mental illness (SPMI) and surgical outcomes after inpatient mastectomy for breast cancer.
      • Despande A.J.
      • Bhandarkar A.
      • Bobo W.
      • et al.
      Examining the relationship between severe persistent mental illness and surgical outcomes in women undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer.
      The authors used the National Inpatient Sample from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project and discovered that women with SPMI had a longer length of stay (LOS), were more likely to undergo bilateral mastectomies, less likely to undergo breast reconstruction, and that those who underwent reconstruction were at an increased risk of post-procedural infection and sepsis.
      • Despande A.J.
      • Bhandarkar A.
      • Bobo W.
      • et al.
      Examining the relationship between severe persistent mental illness and surgical outcomes in women undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer.
      This work illuminates the negative impacts psychological distress and illness has on surgical breast cancer outcomes and provides insight into potential solutions to support this vulnerable population through their diagnosis and subsequent surgery.
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